Aviation Forums Forum Index Aviation Forums
Aviation discussions newsgroups
 
Archives   FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Transponder Codes
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Aviation Forums Forum Index -> Flying related activities in the UK
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
graham@dircon.co.uk
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 4:49 pm    Post subject: Transponder Codes Reply with quote



Yesterday, I did my second cross country navigation exercise that
involved flying from Coventry Airport to Leicester Airport to
Sywell/Northampton Airport.

I was told to Squark 0250 upon departure from Coventry.

For the aviation law exam you have to learn several of the codes (7700
- emergency, 7600 - radio failure, 7500 - hijack, 7000 - conspicuity
code etc)

However, I was wondering how the rest of the codes are allocated and
is there a list that shows their specific meanings?

The Trevor Thom books do not really explain this point.

Thanks,
Graham




Back to top
graham@dircon.co.uk
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 6:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote



On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 17:15:47 +0000, Peter
<nobody (AT) somewhere-in-the-uk (DOT) com> wrote:


Quote:
There is no reason for a pilot to know anything about this.

Probably, but how will I know until I know


(:-)


Quote:
I have never seen a definitive doc and I doubt there is a public one.
It is very obvious that certain ATC units have blocks of codes,
perhaps two blocks (one for VFR and one for IFR; I saw something like
that with Farnborough yesterday).

Out of interest, do transponder codes stay the same throughout a IFR
flight? For example, suppose you had a jumbo leaving Heathrow.
Presumably, they would be told to squark a particular code? Under what
circumstances, during a typical flight, would the pilot be told to
change from one code to another?

Graham



Back to top
graham@dircon.co.uk
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 6:25 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 17:15:47 +0000, Peter
<nobody (AT) somewhere-in-the-uk (DOT) com> wrote:


Quote:
I have never seen a definitive doc and I doubt there is a public one.

I've just had another look around on the net and I have found this:

http://www.vatsim-uk.org/Training/basic.asp

Not sure if it is up to date. However, it appears that, for example,
4650 and 4651 are allocated to Coventry approach. Heathrow "domestic"
flights have a group of 14 codes.

0250 (the code that I was using) is allocated to "Anglia Radar".

Perhaps Coventry were worried that I might get really lost and end up
heading for Norwich rather than Northampton?

(:-)

Another site that I came across said that the transponder code system
was set in the second world war so that radar operators could identify
friendly aircraft. The transponder project was secret and was
codenamed "parrot". To confuse the enemy, pilots were told to "squark
your parrot".

Graham



Back to top
Julian Scarfe
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

<graham (AT) dircon (DOT) co.uk> wrote


Quote:
However, I was wondering how the rest of the codes are allocated and
is there a list that shows their specific meanings?

AIP ENR 1.6.2
http://www.ais.org.uk/aes/pubs/aip/pdf/enr/2010602.PDF

has the list you want.

Julian



Back to top
graham@dircon.co.uk
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 19:00:45 GMT, "Julian Scarfe" <julian (AT) avbrief (DOT) com>
wrote:

Quote:
http://www.ais.org.uk/aes/pubs/aip/pdf/enr/2010602.PDF

Thanks for that.

Graham



Back to top
karel
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote


<graham (AT) dircon (DOT) co.uk> wrote

Quote:
On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 17:15:47 +0000, Peter
[email]nobody (AT) somewhere-in-the-uk (DOT) com[/email]> wrote:

http://www.vatsim-uk.org/Training/basic.asp

Not sure if it is up to date. However, it appears that, for example,
4650 and 4651 are allocated to Coventry approach. Heathrow "domestic"
flights have a group of 14 codes.

Likewise I am told that my home field of Antwerp (EBAW) has eight.
Quote:
(:-)

Another site that I came across said that the transponder code system
was set in the second world war so that radar operators could identify
friendly aircraft. The transponder project was secret and was
codenamed "parrot". To confuse the enemy, pilots were told to "squark
your parrot".

Yes, in my PPL ground school I was also tought
that transponders were first conceived as IFF system
(Friend / Foe Identification) or is it FFI?

KA



Back to top
Bob Walton
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 9:12 am    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

In article <482jt05q0mmsmsbjm0m315fn99e1d8o4s2 (AT) 4ax (DOT) com>,
[email]graham (AT) dircon (DOT) co.uk[/email] () wrote:

Quote:
Out of interest, do transponder codes stay the same throughout a IFR
flight? For example, suppose you had a jumbo leaving Heathrow.

For an Airways (and hence by definition an IFR) flight across large chunks
of Europe, the code assigned at departure will normally stay with you
throughout the flight - but not always. ISTR this was a policy
introduced across Europe a few years back to avoid continually
changing squawks as you pass from one unit to another, with the subsequent
potential for confusion.

Once you drop out of the airways or get passed to a local area radar
controller, you sometimes get assigned another code.

Bob Walton
(eMail to my first name is more likely to reach me)

Back to top
Bob Walton
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 9:12 am    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

In article <41d99f2d$0$3015$ba620e4c (AT) news (DOT) skynet.be>,
[email]adelcoGENE (AT) zeverSKYNET (DOT) BE[/email] (karel) wrote:

Quote:
that transponders were first conceived as IFF system
(Friend / Foe Identification) or is it FFI?

"Identification - Friend or Foe?"

Bob Walton
(eMail to my first name is more likely to reach me)

Back to top
graham@dircon.co.uk
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 10:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 21:17:15 +0000, Pete <aspen3 (AT) freeuk (DOT) com> wrote:


Quote:
If you are really interested [beats me why] you might drop a
line to West Drayton and I am sure they will feed you
something.

I don't think that would be necessary. I have now found the list of
codes and they appear to be self-explanatory.

It has answered my question.

Graham




Back to top
Bob Walton
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 8:57 am    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

In article <s1skt05nudtiquukr82b382aait6o0e7jv (AT) 4ax (DOT) com>,
[email]nobody (AT) somewhere-in-the-uk (DOT) com[/email] (Peter) wrote:

Quote:
IFF *is* a transponder.

Indeed: I was merely remaking that the usual TLA was IFF, rather than FFI

Bob Walton
(eMail to my first name is more likely to reach me)

Back to top
Simon Hewison
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 10:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

Ross Younger wrote:
Quote:
The average pilot doesn't need to know anything beyond 7000 and the
special-purpose codes; ATC will tell you when to use anything else.
And yes, every country will have their own squawk assignment plan.

7000 is the conspicuity code in the UK, other countries have different
codes (eg 1200 in the USA), so even the 'standard' isn't a standard as such.

--
Simon Hewison

Back to top
VinMan
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 11:07 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

[email]graham (AT) dircon (DOT) co.uk[/email] a écrit :


Quote:
I've just had another look around on the net and I have found this:
http://www.vatsim-uk.org/Training/basic.asp

Not sure if it is up to date.

I think it's almost good. For instance the 23xx series is really used in
Brest airspace for transit (Spain to UK).
But lots of others series are only described by their British use, when
they are ALSO used abroad for different purpose, not mentioned here.

Quote:
Another site that I came across said that the transponder code system
was set in the second world war so that radar operators could identify
friendly aircraft. The transponder project was secret and was
codenamed "parrot". To confuse the enemy, pilots were told to "squark
your parrot".

I've always said and written "squawk" : am I wrong ?
--
VinMan

www.ciel-et-partage.org

Back to top
VinMan
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 11:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

Peter a écrit :

Quote:
But I still wonder what use it is knowing this, to a pilot.

Don't even bother about it and fly your plane !
People are PAID to know and use these series...
Wink
--
VinMan

www.ciel-et-partage.org

Back to top
VinMan
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 11:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

Simon Hewison a écrit :

Quote:
7000 is the conspicuity code in the UK, other countries have different
codes (eg 1200 in the USA), so even the 'standard' isn't a standard as
such.

7000 in France too, for a VFR flight not in contact with a Flight
Information Service.
So it would tend to BE a standard... except in the US, as usual.
Remember their altimeter setting in mm of Hg...
--
VinMan

www.ciel-et-partage.org

Back to top
VinMan
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 11:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Transponder Codes Reply with quote

Bob Walton a écrit :

Quote:
For an Airways (and hence by definition an IFR) flight across large chunks
of Europe, the code assigned at departure will normally stay with you
throughout the flight - but not always.

According to what I observe, most do keep their codes, true.
It's because they remain in the same ORCAM region.
(since you all seem to be interested in code allocation, take a seat and
enjoy yourself here : http://minilien.com/?b8Kq6XIY2I )

**Some** of the flights that we get from Spanish airspace have to be
allocated a new squawk, but it's a minority.

Quote:
ISTR this was a policy
introduced across Europe a few years back to avoid continually
changing squawks as you pass from one unit to another, with the subsequent
potential for confusion.

True : very useful indeed.

Quote:
Once you drop out of the airways or get passed to a local area radar
controller, you sometimes get assigned another code.

Not in France, for an IFR flight.
--
VinMan

www.ciel-et-partage.org

Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Aviation Forums Forum Index -> Flying related activities in the UK All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 1 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB