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maximum altitude

 
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Masqqqqqqq
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 7:29 am    Post subject: maximum altitude Reply with quote



I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above 10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.


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Peter Wendell
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 1:16 pm    Post subject: Re: maximum altitude Reply with quote



Masqqqqqqq wrote:
Quote:
I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above 10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.

I'm a PP and don't fly ultralights (I fly gyroplanes), but from reading
the FARs it looks like it is legal to operate an ultralight in Class E
airspace that does not surround an airport. Therefore I guess you can
leagally fly up to the ceiling of Class E, which, in most places, is
17,999'. Of course you will need oxygen.

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Richard Carlisle
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 2:12 pm    Post subject: Re: maximum altitude Reply with quote

The FAA says above 12,500 you need oxygen and 18,000 feet or above you must
be on an IRF flight plan. The oxygen rule is just common sense and probably
wouldn't apply to a single seat UL, but UL's are not allowed to fly IFR, so
the ceiling for a UL would be 18,000.

No need for a transponder unless you are IFR and above 18,000, which is not
legal for a UL anyway.

The ceiling for a Sport Pilot is 10,000 ASL. The problem there is that for
the guys out west, sometimes it takes more than that just to clear a
mountain ridge.

Ross



Quote:
I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above 10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the
FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.


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Ray Abbruzzese
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 1:54 pm    Post subject: Re: maximum altitude Reply with quote

I have had a Kolb Firestar with Rotax 377 up to 15,585ft msl over Mt. Elbert
in Colorado and wrote about the flight in "Ultralight Flying" magazine in
1997 or 98. Didn't use O2, just checked myself at regular intervals and came
down after approx. 45 minutes.

Ray Abbruzzese

"Masqqqqqqq" <masqqqqqqq (AT) aol (DOT) com> wrote

Quote:
I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the
maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum
allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above
10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the
FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs
poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.



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Masqqqqqqq
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:52 pm    Post subject: Re: maximum altitude Reply with quote

Quote:

"Masqqqqqqq" <masqqqqqqq (AT) aol (DOT) com> wrote in message
news:20041114022911.16116.00000659 (AT) mb-m02 (DOT) aol.com...
I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the
maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum
allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above
10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the
FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs
poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.

I should clarify that last sentence.
The engine runs poorly, above about 11,000 feet, because I don't have in
flight adjustable carbs. It runs great at lower altitude.
The wings don't lift enough.....above about 11,000 feet, to climb much
higher. They lift great at lower altitudes.

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Mark Hansen
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 9:30 pm    Post subject: Re: maximum altitude Reply with quote

On 11/13/2004 23:29, Masqqqqqqq wrote:

Quote:
I've been watching a debate on the Kolb mailing list, about the maximum
allowed altitude for an ultralight.
Any input from the people here?
When I took training, (11 years ago), we were taught the maximum allowed
was 13,500 MSL. On the Kolb list, there is debate about going above 10,000
MSL..........need for oxygen and transponder and prior permission from the FAA.
I know my UltraStar won't reach 13,500 MSL.........the engine runs poorly
and the wings don't lift enough to climb that high.

I'm not sure how this would play out, but according to the FARs
(specifically, 91.215 (b) (5) (i)), aircraft are required to have a
mode-C transponder when at or above 10,000 feet MSL within the
boundaries of the 48 contiguous United States (note that I'm
generalizing on the type of transponder here, but it's close enough).

The issue is that Part 103 (and its associated ACs) make it clear
that ultralights are not "aircraft", they are "ultralight vehicles".

Otherwise, I don't remember anything in Part 103 that would impose
any restriction on maximum altitude (at not until 18,000 feet MSL).


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