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Intro and question about Easy Riser

 
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mike regish
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2005 3:27 pm    Post subject: Intro and question about Easy Riser Reply with quote



Hi all.
My name's Mike and I started hang-gliding in 1976 in a home built (not by
me) "you stall, you die" Rogallo wing. I went from that to a Dragonfly (hang
glider-not ultralight) and from there to a powered ultralight. I now have my
private license and own a 1953 Piper Tripacer. I have about 350 hours as a
private pilot.

I am now in the local Civil Air Patrol and have offered them my old Easy
Riser as a restoration project for the cadets' Aerospace Education program.
The airframe was in generally good shape, but it definitely needed
recovering as well as the replacement of a few dented tubes. No major
problem getting those materials but, since I brought it to the CAP base
almost all of the ribs are damaged. I think the damage might have been
intentional as one of the old coots that is a member was all pissed off when
I showed up with it. I have no idea why, but that doesn't really matter.

My problem now is trying to find a source of wing ribs. I've done some
googling, but haven't come up with anything. One side of this machine has
stamped aluminum ribs and the other side has foam core ribs. Does anybody
know of a source for some new ribs-either style? I don't know if this EZ
will ever fly again, but we'd like to at least get it in show condition to
use for exhibits. I guess we could just make some out of plywood for show,
but I'd rather actually make it flyable again, if at al l possible.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

TIA and keep flyin'.

mike




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red
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2005 8:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Intro and question about Easy Riser Reply with quote



Mike,
I'm willing to help the restoration, but I kinda hope nobody
flies it. Still, the choice is yours, so I'll do my best to make
it safer. Sources (links) follow...
*Wheels at the trailing edge can save the pilot from severe back
injury on a blown launch, or a noisy landing. You'll have to
invent the undercarriage, but the alternative could be very bad
news.
*The paraglider pilots can supply you with a for-real
seated/supine harness (their most basic models are fine).
*I'd want a ballistic reserve parachute (BRS) on a Riser; a
hand-tossed reserve would be a real trick, even for experts.
*Stitts cloth covering is about the best, with several grades of
finish available, including a flexible glossy finish that looks
like painted metal. They have an excellent booklet of covering
instructions that you can buy, or maybe borrow from the EAA guys.
*All of the wires are too old to trust, now. Recommend all new
stainless steel rigging.
*Tall weeds are very dangerous to a Riser, when launching or
landing. Crank up the big mower... Smile
I started flying back when you did, and my rigid wing was the
Fledgling. Still at it, with a few thousand hours now, and none
of it in planes...
http://www.xmission.com/~red/history/history.htm
The best of the Risers (IMHO) were the Aeroplanes. All of their
W.W.I replicas are really Risers in disguise. These guys once
made and sold stamped Riser ribs, but I don't know if they still
do.
http://www.loehle.com/Aircraft_Kits.htm
You can make stamped ribs easily. I recommend rib
stitching. You need curved sewing needles, but they are not hard
to find. Space the rib-stitching holes to match the curved
needles you find, to keep things simple. Cut one wood template
for the the top ribs, and one for the bottom ribs. CAUTION: the
top ribs of a Riser are airfoil (lifting) ribs, the bottom ribs
are making your *stabilizers!* Do NOT use the same template for
top and bottom ribs! Use the best stamped ribs that you have
left, to make templates. I searched and found some good pictures
by David Witt. The same process is also used for some homebuilt
aircraft. He's making half-ribs with lightening holes, but
one-piece ribs are made the same way. Make your ribs from
6061-T6, at least as thick as the stock ribs.
Stack all of the rib blanks together, between the two wood
templates, and fasten with the two bolts. Then cut all rib
blanks to size, at one time. Use a metal-cutting blade in a
powered hand-held sabre saw, or a band saw, if available. Only
the two bolt holes are needed. The large (lightening) holes
probably are not needed, and are not wanted, with the low-camber
ribs of a Riser. Again, if you want to employ rib-stitching,
drill all of the small holes needed, now.
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0306.JPG

Put one rib between the templates, fasten with the two bolts,
and begin bending.
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0344.JPG

Flutes may be cut into the wood template, like the one above the
hammer handle. This fluting allows the top of the rib to curve,
if you want to prevent cracks in the metal.
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0354.JPG

Finished fluting:
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0357.JPG

Rib being clamped with bolts:
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0308.JPG

Rib completed:
http://www.davidwitt.ca/sonexlog/images/PICT0316.JPG

Undercut the templates at the edges, so the metal can be
bent too far, and it will spring out then, to make a flat rib
edge:

/---------------------- <--edges not vertical
/ wood template <--rib-stitching holes here
( ) <-round over
========================== <--Rib goes here
( ) <-round over these edges
wood template / to prevent cracking rib
______________________/ <--edges not vertical

--
(Replies *will* bounce, unless you delete
the letter A from my email address)
Cheers,
Red
************************
P.S. Not relevant, but...
Free advice, and maybe worth the price,
for new and low-time HG pilots,
at my website:
http://www.xmission.com/~red/

mike regish wrote:
Quote:
Hi all.
My name's Mike and I started hang-gliding in 1976 in a home built (not by
me) "you stall, you die" Rogallo wing. I went from that to a Dragonfly (hang
glider-not ultralight) and from there to a powered ultralight. I now have my
private license and own a 1953 Piper Tripacer. I have about 350 hours as a
private pilot.

I am now in the local Civil Air Patrol and have offered them my old Easy
Riser as a restoration project for the cadets' Aerospace Education program.
The airframe was in generally good shape, but it definitely needed
recovering as well as the replacement of a few dented tubes. No major
problem getting those materials but, since I brought it to the CAP base
almost all of the ribs are damaged. I think the damage might have been
intentional as one of the old coots that is a member was all pissed off when
I showed up with it. I have no idea why, but that doesn't really matter.

My problem now is trying to find a source of wing ribs. I've done some
googling, but haven't come up with anything. One side of this machine has
stamped aluminum ribs and the other side has foam core ribs. Does anybody
know of a source for some new ribs-either style? I don't know if this EZ
will ever fly again, but we'd like to at least get it in show condition to
use for exhibits. I guess we could just make some out of plywood for show,
but I'd rather actually make it flyable again, if at all possible.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

TIA and keep flyin'.

mike

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mike regish
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 1:29 am    Post subject: Re: Intro and question about Easy Riser Reply with quote

Wow!
Thanks. This is great stuff. I have it all bookmarked. I have all the
original plans, but they're kind of ratty from age and I don't know if they
have instructions for actually making the ribs. I'll have to look through
them again.

I don't know if it will ever fly again. I only managed a couple of ground
hops with it-barely got off the ground-before I broke it trying to kite it
up the hill on a windy day. It got away from me in a strong gust, flipped
over and broke a wing tip and one tip rudder. Otherwise there was no damage
at all. I had it stored in my dad's garage for a couple of decades and I
think he got pissed and smacked it a couple of times. The dented tubes look
kind of intentional. I have the tip rudder frames and can get tubing, but
the ribs were a problem. As my current plane-the Tripacer-is a tube and
fabric plane, I'm somewhat familiar with fabric, though it uses much heavier
stuff than the Riser.

I kind of doubt it will ever fly again, but I'm wondering about your hoping
it never flies. Do you say that because of the design and/or flight
characteristics or just because of the extent of repairs?

The guy I bought it from was kind of a hot dog and found out the hard way
why you shouldn't do really, really steep turns in it. He ended up nose
down, standing on the front bar and realized he could no longer shift his
weight back. About 50 feet above terra firma, he threw his legs out and that
pulled him out of the dive and saved him. He also found out why you should
use rib stitching rather than glue, but that's another story.

Thanks a bunch for the tips and links. Do you mind if I keep your e-mail
address in case I have any questions in the future?

Thanks again.

mike

"red" <read (AT) xmission (DOT) com> wrote

Quote:
Mike,
I'm willing to help the restoration, but I kinda hope nobody
flies it. Still, the choice is yours, so I'll do my best to make
it safer. Sources (links) follow...



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fbloogyudsr
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 3:29 am    Post subject: Re: Intro and question about Easy Riser Reply with quote

"mike regish" <mregish (AT) comcast (DOT) net> wrote
Quote:
My name's Mike and I started hang-gliding in 1976 in a home built (not by
me) "you stall, you die" Rogallo wing. I went from that to a Dragonfly
(hang glider-not ultralight) and from there to a powered ultralight. I now
have my private license and own a 1953 Piper Tripacer. I have about 350
hours as a private pilot.

I don't know if Ken is still enlisted in this NG - it's kind of slow.
Anyway, Ken de Russy might be a good resource: [email]WeFlyUniv (AT) aol (DOT) com[/email].
He has a HG museum and is quite knowledgeable about this stuff. If you
google this group you will his other contact info and many postings.

FloydR


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red
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 3:43 am    Post subject: Re: Intro and question about Easy Riser Reply with quote

mike regish wrote:
Quote:
Wow!
Thanks. This is great stuff. I have it all bookmarked.

No sweat. :-)

Quote:
I don't know if it will ever fly again. I only managed a couple of ground
hops with it-barely got off the ground-before I broke it trying to kite it
up the hill on a windy day. It got away from me in a strong gust, flipped
over and broke a wing tip and one tip rudder. Otherwise there was no damage
at all.

You will have no problem copying the good side, mirror image, to
replace the damaged parts.

Quote:
I kind of doubt it will ever fly again, but I'm wondering about your hoping
it never flies. Do you say that because of the design and/or flight
characteristics or just because of the extent of repairs?

The Riser has a rear cage tube that hits the pilot across the
spine, if they blow a launch or landing. In any uncoordinated
encounter with dirt, the harness will hold the upper body
upright, while the glider bends the legs backward at the hips;
this can cause very serious spinal injuries, and worse
(especially for males).
That glider needs a trailer, or a car-top box for transport.
The lower wing can catch on tall grass, so only the best of
launch areas and LZs are good enough for it. The glider needs a
full-time baby-sitter whenever it is not being flown, or not in
the box - that gets old really fast. The bottom surface of the
wing is always getting punctured by rocks and sticks, anyway.
Beyond the practical matters, the performance is pitiful, in
comparison with modern gliders. A single-surfaced trainer HG
today would weigh less, cost less, assemble in much less time,
perform much better, and you would not need a trailer.
Since there are very few experienced pilots of a Riser, anybody
with one would really be teaching themselves how to fly it, and
man, I really hoped those bad old days were done. I would
strongly recommend that a pilot be an experienced Hang III (HG
intermediate, with a heavy logbook), before attempting a Riser.
If somebody had that much HG experience, I imagine it might be
difficult to convince most pilots to step down to a Riser, from
today's wings.
Pilot visibility is really poor; you can't see up, or down, and
I have even seen Riser rudders covered with tough clear plastic
sheet, to improve visibility to the sides. One Riser had the
lower wing covering built with clear "windows" near the pilot, to
allow some limited visibility downward to each side.

Quote:
The guy I bought it from was kind of a hot dog and found out the hard way
why you shouldn't do really, really steep turns in it. He ended up nose
down, standing on the front bar and realized he could no longer shift his
weight back. About 50 feet above terra firma, he threw his legs out and that
pulled him out of the dive and saved him. He also found out why you should
use rib stitching rather than glue, but that's another story.

Right. The guy did everything wrong, and he was luckier than I
have words for. What ya don't know can kill ya. If he *had*
known, all he had to do was deploy both rudders at once, and it
would have pitched up hard (all drag being above the center of
mass). Provided he did that skillfully enough to avoid a
high-speed stall, the Riser would have resumed normal flight
almost instantly. Instead, he was just bracing for impact (but
the wrong way there, too - he would have been crippled if not
killed). These are not stunts that you want to be learning below
1000 feet (300 m) AGL. I'd still want a BRS aboard, too. If
anybody really did that high-speed dive recovery, after a
post-flight inspection, they would probably agree with
rib-stitching being necessary, too.

Quote:
Thanks a bunch for the tips and links. Do you mind if I keep your e-mail
address in case I have any questions in the future?
Thanks again.
mike

Happy to help, any time. I *did* like the Riser, despite the
flaws, and it should make a good project for your junior
birdmen. If anybody really wants to fly it, though, I'd
recommend building it into the W.W.I German Taube (Dove) or
Fokker D7 (the sweep makes it an excellent scale replica).
If you want something really practical for your birdmen to fly,
check out the plans for the Bug(4) (for cuteness) or the Goat(1)
(for performance). Both are garage-technology, needing only hand
tools. Floyd Fronius just did a 60 mile X-Country flight with a
Goat(1):
http://home.att.net/~m--sandlin/bug.htm
--
(Replies *will* bounce, unless you delete
the letter A from my email address)
Cheers,
Red
************************
P.S. Not relevant, but...
Free advice, and maybe worth the price,
for new and low-time HG pilots,
at my website:
http://www.xmission.com/~red/

Quote:
"red" <read (AT) xmission (DOT) com> wrote in message
news:431CAD85.B0CEF1FF (AT) xmission (DOT) com...
Mike,
I'm willing to help the restoration, but I kinda hope nobody
flies it. Still, the choice is yours, so I'll do my best to make
it safer. Sources (links) follow...

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